Terror, terror everywhere?

Autor(en)
Jörg Matthes, Desiree Schmuck, Christian von Sikorski
Abstrakt

Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries. How the news media portray these attacks may crucially influence emotional responses and support for anti-Muslim policies such as immigration bans. Based on the Extended parallel response model (EPRM, Witte, 1992), we theorize that specific features of terrorism news such as threat severity (e.g., high vs. low number of potential terrorist offenders) and threat controllability (e.g., nondiffuse, controllable threat vs. diffuse, uncontrollable threat) influence individuals' emotional reactions and policy support. A quota-based online experiment (N = 501) reveals that news articles featuring a high number of offenders increase individuals' fear of terror irrespective of whether the threat is portrayed as controllable or not. News articles featuring a low number of offenders only evoke fear of terror if the threat is portrayed as diffuse. Additionally, news articles emphasizing a high number of offenders combined with a controllable terrorism threat elicit anger on the government. Both anger and fear of terror subsequently increase anti-Muslim policy support.

Organisation(en)
Institut für Publizistik- und Kommunikationswissenschaft
Externe Organisation(en)
Universität Koblenz-Landau
Journal
Political Psychology
Band
40
Seiten
935-951
Anzahl der Seiten
17
ISSN
0162-895X
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1111/pops.12576
Publikationsdatum
10-2019
Peer-reviewed
Ja
ÖFOS 2012
508007 Kommunikationswissenschaft, 508014 Publizistik
Schlagwörter
ASJC Scopus Sachgebiete
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Philosophy, Social Psychology, Political Science and International Relations, Sociology and Political Science
Link zum Portal
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/de/publications/terror-terror-everywhere(2e67fba2-11f7-4435-8260-8f2076d7538a).html